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Toplist Points 0 == Toplist Rank [50.000+ (bad)]

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Officially a permanent gold LPL card holder. You always have a place at our library, Rakim.

26 seconds ago

Officially a permanent gold LPL card holder. You always have a place at our library, Rakim.

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Congratulations to the 2020 Alex Award winners! The Alex Award highlights excellent adult books with high appeal for teen...
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1 day ago

Congratulations to the 2020 Alex Award winners! The Alex Award highlights excellent adult books with high appeal for teen...

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I’m so happy to announce that my upcoming poetry collection coffee days whiskey nights is coming to you September 8th, 2020 from...

3 days ago

I’m so happy to announce that my upcoming poetry collection coffee days whiskey nights is coming to you September 8th, 2020 from...

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So here’s something super fun: today only (1/24/2020), as part of the Nook Free Friday promotion, Every Heart a Doorway (Wayward...
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4 days ago

So here’s something super fun: today only (1/24/2020), as part of the Nook Free Friday promotion, Every Heart a Doorway (Wayward...

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What to do if your book’s too big: an alignment chart

4 days ago

What to do if your book’s too big: an alignment chart

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                         Here stand my books, line upon line                          They reach the roof, and row by row,      ...
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4 days ago

                         Here stand my books, line upon line                          They reach the roof, and row by row,      ...

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I’m excited to reveal the cover for my upcoming book, I WILL JUDGE YOU BY YOUR BOOKSHELF! It features all my best comics on...

5 days ago

I’m excited to reveal the cover for my upcoming book, I WILL JUDGE YOU BY YOUR BOOKSHELF! It features all my best comics on...

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In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr....

5 days ago

In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr....

5 days ago

Is the paperback of priory out yet? I can’t wait to read it!

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Some of today’s new releases, part 1

6 days ago

Some of today’s new releases, part 1

someone recommend me some good fantasy books that aren’t centred on a war, please, my crops are dying

The Greta Helsing novels by Vivian Shaw - practical doctor to the undead defeats mildly ominous interdimensional threats with the aid of domestic vampires and a demon accountant.

Sunshine by Robin McKinley - practical baker is captured by vampires, escapes, reluctantly teams up with better vampire to kill the bad one.

Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones - young hat maker ages 60 years overnight, proceeds to upend the life of a disaster wizard while learning self-confidence.

the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett - hard to encapsulate, but equally funny and hard-hitting, tackling race and gender and corruption and other forms of inequality while also, like, making fun of post offices and Hollywood and Shakespeare. Three or four tackle war, true, but there’s something like 35 others to choose from.

the Accidental Turn series by J.M. Frey - recent Ph.D of colour lands in the Fantasyland™ she did her thesis on, goes off about agency and diversity while recovering from the Dark Lord’s attentions and learning the truth about her fictional crush.

Middlegame by Seanan McGuire - evil alchemist creates superpowered children to assist world takeover; children just want to be a family; family is complicated.

Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik - young woman takes over family business, must outwit fairies with a love of gold.

the Enchanted Forest Chronicles by Patricia C. Wrede - princess runs away to become a dragon’s housekeeper, fights off rescuers, solves problems large and small, melts wizards.

the October Daye novels by Seanan Mcguire - Half-fae detective solves murders, finds missing persons, develops found family, can’t stop self from upending the social order.

The Golem and the Djinni by Helene Wecker - A quiet golem, a tempestuous djinn, Gilded Age New York. Immigrants, identity, friendship, hope, and self-discovery.

An Unkindness of Magicians by Kat Howard - A witch from an outsider House enters New York’s magical Hunger Games, to prove a point. The problems of magic were not intended.

Zoo City by Lauren Beukes - Part-time con artist gets hired to find two missing pop stars, with the help of the magical sloth on her back. Noir ensues.

Child of a Hidden Sea by A.M. Dellamonica - Nature photographer lands on water-world, discovers lost family, tries to convince self magic is impossible.

Gods Behaving Badly by Marie Phillips - Greek gods, washed up in North London, curse Apollo to fall for the cleaner. Existential crisis, meet rom-com.

Among Others by Jo Walton - Loner teen sent to boarding school, discovers science fiction, might know fairies and do magic.

Tooth and Claw by Jo Walton - Austenesque story except all the characters are dragons.

Every Heart a Doorway (and sequels) by Seanan McGuire - the children of portal fantasy end up in boarding school coping with being kicked out of their various worlds, then some of them start getting murdered. 

The Gracekeepers by Kirsty Logan - the world is flooded, there’s a lady who works with a bear at a circus that sails to different places to perform, and a lady who is sort of an undertaker, and they fall in love

Lud-in-the-Mist by Hope Mirrlees - there are fairies but no one talks about them anymore because That’s Just Not How We Are except this state of affairs cannot possibly last and people start getting lured to fairyland

The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison - fifth son of emperor who’s lived his whole life away from court abruptly becomes emperor when his father and older brothers are killed in an accident, spends entire book trying to make friends and figure how the fuck to do a) confidence and b) ruling ethically

The Various by Steven Augarde - girl spends summer at uncle’s farm, finds the group of “various” (no direct parallel, but think somewhere between gnomes and pixies) that live in the woods, mysterious history, flying horse, The Cat Is Evil (this is technically middle grade but it’s so good I can’t even)

Turning Darkness Into Light by Marie Brennan - working on the translation of an ancient text is complicated when it might have a huge impact on the public perception of a highly stigmatised group; subterfuge, found family, mythology, and the rejection of men who steal other people’s work. 

The Sharing Knife series by Lois McMaster Bujold - Fighting monsters and bandits, yes, but also fighting prejudice, intercultural communications breakdowns, in-laws, outdated traditions, and chores

Under the Pendulum Sun by Jeanette Ng - a gently reared young lady goes to fairyland to find her missionary brother, instead finds a crazy gothic mansion full of mysteries  

Daughter of the Forest, by Juliet Marillier - lush high fantasy retelling of the Seven Swans

Seraphina, by Rachel Hartman - murder, intrigue, and music in a world where humans maintain an uneasy peace with shapeshifting dragons

Sorcerer to the Crown, by Zen Cho - brilliant but marginalized sorcerer and brilliant but marginalized social climber take on Regency England 

Six of Crows, by Leigh Bardugo - Fantasy heist starring ragtag band of teenaged delinquents armed with magic and trauma 

Vessel, by Sarah Beth Durst - a girl raised to be a vessel for a goddess tries to figure out why her goddess failed to show and also save the world 

Stardust, by Neil Gaiman - Guy goes to fairyland to catch a star to impress his True Love, what could possibly go wrong 

The Thief,  by Megan Whalen Turner - Marvelous swashbuckling middle grade quest story and first in a series of complex and political and twisty books, beware of spoilers 

Penric’s Progress, by Lois McMaster Bujold - A collection of the first three Penric and Desdemona novellas, which follow a mild-mannered accidental sorcerer and his centuries-old snarky demon as they go on quests, solve mysteries, dabble in intrigues, and generally sow chaos wherever they go 

The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien - There is one major battle and the POV character misses ALL of it because Jirt thinks war is stupid 

A Face Like Glass, by Frances Hardinge - amazingly lush and imaginative underground world and the girl who fell down into it, was raised by cheeses, and is about to cause a whole lot of trouble 

Deeplight, by Frances Hardinge - the terrifying Lovecraftian ocean gods are dead but their secrets live on 

(look I’m just trying to avoid the temptation to link to all of Frances Hardinge but maybe check out all of Frances Hardinge)

Sorcery of Thorns, by Margaret Rogerson - Sword wielding librarian fights demons and the patriarchy 

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, by N.K. Jemisin - An unlikely heir competes for the most powerful job in a world where captured gods are weapons  

The Squire’s Tales by Gerald Morris - Laugh-out-loud funny and also magical and source-material-level weird MG series on Arthurian romance, some battles but mostly quests and complaining about how stupid knights can be, shading darker towards the end of the series for obvious reasons 

Starless, by Jacqueline Carey - kind of war but more of a coming of age and quest book with a big battle at the end? A child fated from birth to be companion to a princess is trained by warrior monks and dropped headfirst into a scheming court of near-immortal royals 

The Earthsea Cycle, by Ursula K LeGuin - the education of a wizard in primal magic and ancient secrets 

A note: I tried to stick with high fantasy or close to it, as that’s generally what people are looking for when they get stuck in War Is Hell for two thousand pages 

A further note: I adore so many of the books on @anassarhenisch and @hermitknut‘s lists and will definitely have to check out the others, thanks y’all! 

10 days ago

someone recommend me some good fantasy books that aren’t centred on a war, please, my crops are dying

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Currently reading!

10 days ago

Currently reading!

Ok, folks. It’s cold. Time to dive under the covers and hibernate next to a teetering pile of books. Time to kick off that 2020 reading challenge. Time to plant the TBR seeds that will go into the flowers that make up new spring books…or something (I don’t know, I’m sleepy). Here we go!

JANUARY 2020

1/14: Zed by Joanna Kavenna: In the not-so-distant future, a global tech corporation has made a perfect world with a perfect algorithm…but what to do about all these messy people?

1/21: The Janes by Louisa Luna: the follow up to Luna’s thriller TWO GIRLS DOWN, THE JANES follows private investigators Alice Vega and Max Caplan as they work to identify two Jane Does discovered on the outskirts of San Diego.

FEBRUARY 2020

2/11: The Illness Lesson by Clare Beams: at a newly founded school for girls in 19th century New England, the students are falling mysteriously ill…when a sinister doctor is brought in to treat them, a young teacher must decide how to save her pupils - and herself.

2/25: Soot by Dan Vyleta: the sequel to national bestseller SMOKE, this fantastical story brings readers back into a universe that is “part Dickens, part dystopia, and totally immersive” (Entertainment Weekly).

2/25: The Storm Before the Calm by George Friedman: a master geopolitical forecaster predicts the dramatic upheaval of government, foreign policy, economics and culture in the 2020s.

MARCH 2020

3/3: The Back Roads to March by John Feinstein: a fascinating journey through the unsung, unpublicized, and often unknown heroes of college basketball.

3/3: The Body Double by Emily Beyda: an unnamed young woman is approached and asked to give up her old life and identity to impersonate a reclusive Hollywood star…gritty, glamorous, and seriously deranged.

3/3: The Velvet Rope Economy by Nelson Schwartz: if you’ve ever been to Disney World, or flown on an airplane, applied to college, or stayed in a hospital…you’re familiar with the way an invisible velvet rope divides Americans in every arena of life. This book investigates the toll this velvet rope takes on society.

3/10: Good Citizens Need Not Fear by Maria Reva: A brilliant and bitingly funny collection of stories united around a single crumbling apartment building in Ukraine.

3/17: Child of Light by Madison Smartt Bell: the first and definitive biography of the great postwar American novelist Robert Stone.

3/17: The Dream Universe by David Lindley: A captivating book that asks the question: what happens when science becomes more theoretical and less tangible? Does modern science have more to do with the philosophy of Plato than measurable phenomena?

3/17: The Lady’s Handbook for Her Mysterious Illness by Sarah Ramey: The darkly funny memoir of Sarah Ramey’s years-long battle with a mysterious illness that doctors thought was all in her head—but wasn’t. A revelation and an inspiration for millions of women whose legitimate health complaints are ignored.

3/17: The New Life of Hugo Gardner by Louis Begley: Divorced after decades of comfortable marriage, retired journalist Hugo Gardner sets out to explore paths not travelled in this sharp new comedy of manners.

3/17: The Red Lotus by Chris Bohjalian: an American man vanishes on a rural road in Vietnam, and his girlfriend, an emergency room doctor trained to ask questions, follows a path that leads her home to the very hospital where they met.

3/31: Code Name Helene by Ariel Lawhon: a story about the BADASS "socialite spy" who killed a Nazi with her bare hands and went on to become one of the most decorated women in WWII.

APRIL 2020

4/7: Hidden Valley Road by Robert Kolker: The heartrending story of a midcentury American family with twelve children, six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia, that became science’s great hope in the quest to understand the disease.

4/14: Bubblegum by Adam Levin: a crazy, hilarious, profound and epic novel that takes place in an alternate-universe Chicagoland suburb where the Internet has never existed. OH, AND THE COVER ACTUALLY SMELLS LIKE BUBBLEGUM.

4/14: Notes From An Apocalypse by Mark O'Connell: absorbing, deeply felt collection of essays about our anxious present tense–and coming to grips with the future.

4/21: What’s Left of Me Is Yours by Stephanie Scott: A gripping debut set in modern-day Tokyo and inspired by a true crime, What’s Left of Me Is Yours charts a young woman’s search for the truth about her mother’s life–and her murder.

4/28: Camino Winds by John Grisham: John Grisham returns to Camino Island where mystery and intrigue once again catch up with novelist Mercer Mann, proving that the suspense never rests—even in paradise.

MAY 2020

5/12: The Anthill by Julianne Pachico: A wildly original blend of satire and social horror that follows Lina, a young woman returning to her home country of Colombia after many years away to volunteer at a daycare center called The Anthill. For fans of movies like Get Out and Parasite.

5/12: Flash Crash by Liam Vaughan: The story of a trading prodigy who amassed $70 million from his childhood bedroom–until the US government accused him of helping trigger an unprecedented market collapse.

11 days ago

All the books coming this winter/spring...

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This summer is going to change everything.

Comic book geek Wesley Hudson excels at two things: slacking off at his job and pining after his best friend, Nico. Advice from his friends, ‘90s alt-rock songs, and online dating articles aren’t helping much with his secret crush. And his dream job at Once Upon a Page, the local used bookstore, is threatened when a coffeeshop franchise wants to buy the property. To top it off, his annoying brother needs wedding planning advice. When all three problems converge, Wes comes face-to-face with the one thing he’s been avoiding—adulthood.

Now, confronted with reality, can Wes balance saving the bookstore and his strained sibling relationship? Can he win the heart of his crush, too? 

From @duetbooks​, start summer August 4th with Julian Winters’ The Summer of Everything.

Cover art by C.B. Messer.

About the Author

Julian Winters is a best-selling author of contemporary young adult fiction. His novels Running With Lions and How to Be Remy Cameron (Duet, 2018 and 2019 respectively), won accolades and awards for their positive depictions of diverse, relatable characters. Running With Lions is the recipient of an IBPA Benjamin Franklin Gold Award. How to Be Remy Cameron received a starred review from School Library Journal and was named a Junior Library Guild selection. A former management trainer, Julian currently lives outside of Atlanta where he can be found reading, being a self-proclaimed comic book geek, or watching the only two sports he can follow—volleyball and soccer.  His novel, The Summer of Everything, will be released in August 2020.

Website: julianwinters.com

Add it to your Goodreads TBR here.

Pre-order now at the IP Web Store, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Apple, Kobo, Book Depository and an indie bookstore near you.

Read the exclusive excerpt at Paste Magazine.

11 days ago

Coming August 4th: THE SUMMER OF EVERYTHING by Julian Winters

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Thom Dunn:

Don’t Read The Comments is the newest book by Eric Smith, a literary agent and author of The Geek’s Guide To Dating and other books, as well as the owner of many adorable pets. (Full disclosure: Eric was also my editor many, many years ago on the Quirk Books blog, and we’ve remained friends since then.) It tells the story of two teens who meet and fall in love pretty much entirely online, with the help of a video massive multiplayer game called “Reclaim The Sun.” Divya Sharma has managed to turn her love of the game into a popular streaming channel that brings in a little bit of revenue for her and her recently-divorced mother. Aaron Jericho is an aspiring video game writer whose parents want nothing more than for him to follow in their footsteps and go to medical school. A chance encounter in “Reclaim The Sun” helps these two isolated brown kids find solace in each other—but a well-orchestrated doxxing campaign from a group of racist, sexist trolls threatens to tear it all down.

On the surface, this is a perfect nerdy setup of star-crossed lovers coming together against all odds, with a touch of hyper-relevant social commentary. In execution, it pulls that off with plenty of delight. It’s certainly not the most high-stakes story I’ve read—the only doomed kingdoms exist in a video game—but Smith manages to keep the characters’ internal stakes on the edge the whole time. And that’s realistic, because these are teenagers, for whom everything does feel the end of the world, even when it’s not. Even when you’re in the video game, and digital avatars do get destroyed, it leaves an emotional impact because it means so much to Divya and Aaron.

This is true even if you—like me—are not much of a gamer yourself. I’m certainly familiar with the fact that watching people live-stream video games is a thing, but it’s not something I’ve ever engaged with. Smith makes this world instantly accessible and understandable, in a way that reminded me of my own high school days on the Internet. There’s a nostalgic element to the wholesomeness of the community-building that happens online, which seems almost alien today—and yet, the looming threats from the Troll Army are still very real, and very present throughout the book. But Smith is also clever enough to make sure that these trolls are never reduced to cardboard cutouts of villainy. They are a huge segment of the gamer market, after all, and the power of profitability ends up affecting both Divya and Aaron in different ways. While Divya’s character arc is generally more compelling, Smith does some important work with Aaron as the benign-but-well-intentioned guy who has to un-learn the stereotypically masculine behaviors he’s internalized in his young life in order to actually become an equal and supportive partner for Divya—and that’s a really important lesson for today.

There are plenty of delightful, corny-nerd-romance moments throughout the book that genuinely left me smiling and giddy. It’s a quick read, and it’s just an utter joy. I’ll leave this review with the initial response that struck me about halfway through reading the book: it’s everything I wanted Ready Player One to be, except with actual emotions, characters, and stakes that gave me something to care about and connect with.

Don’t Read The Comments is out January 28 from Inkyard Press / Harlequin.

https://boingboing.net/2020/01/16/review-dont-read-the-comm.html

12 days ago

Review: "Don't Read The Comments" is a delightful YA antidote to GamerGate

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“Hall’s new book clears a rare middle way for her reader to pursue happiness.” — @nytbooks  Looking for more happiness in 2020?...

12 days ago

“Hall’s new book clears a rare middle way for her reader to pursue happiness.” — @nytbooks Looking for more happiness in 2020?...

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We are venturing #outofthisworld past the moon this week, far into the Milky Way, and beyond. These striking ombrè plates show a...

12 days ago

We are venturing #outofthisworld past the moon this week, far into the Milky Way, and beyond. These striking ombrè plates show a...

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What happens when women translate the Classics  For centuries, translating texts from one language to another has been the...

13 days ago

What happens when women translate the Classics For centuries, translating texts from one language to another has been the...

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Library books    {This is available as a print in my Society6 store!}

13 days ago

Library books {This is available as a print in my Society6 store!}

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The New York Public Library has been loaning books for a long time — the institution turns 125 this year.  To celebrate, the...

13 days ago

The New York Public Library has been loaning books for a long time — the institution turns 125 this year. To celebrate, the...

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New Young Adult Releases Coming Out Today! (January 14th, 2020) ___  Have I missed any new Young Adult releases? Have you added...
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14 days ago

New Young Adult Releases Coming Out Today! (January 14th, 2020) ___ Have I missed any new Young Adult releases? Have you added...

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This manuscript rocks!  Some months ago, the Othmer Library was contacted by a member of the French metal band Aro Ora about...
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14 days ago

This manuscript rocks! Some months ago, the Othmer Library was contacted by a member of the French metal band Aro Ora about...

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Middle School Monday: Pumpkinheads: A Graphic Novel by Rainbow Rowell & Faith Erin Hicks   Josie and Deja spend every autumn...

15 days ago

Middle School Monday: Pumpkinheads: A Graphic Novel by Rainbow Rowell & Faith Erin Hicks Josie and Deja spend every autumn...

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The internet can be a really wonderful place   It’s changed the way we learn and research, the way we connect with others, and...

20 days ago

The internet can be a really wonderful place  It’s changed the way we learn and research, the way we connect with others, and...

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Happy New Year!  We’re back in the office (sigh) and resuming regularly scheduled programming, beginning with Jason Heller’s...
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20 days ago

Happy New Year! We’re back in the office (sigh) and resuming regularly scheduled programming, beginning with Jason Heller’s...

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Weekly Bookish Question #162 (January 5th - January 11th 2020):   New year, new reading adventures!   What is the first book you...

21 days ago

Weekly Bookish Question #162 (January 5th - January 11th 2020): New year, new reading adventures!  What is the first book you...

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So I saw Greta Gerwig’s Little Women and predictably enough I have both Thoughts AND Feelings! But this isn’t a chronological...
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21 days ago

So I saw Greta Gerwig’s Little Women and predictably enough I have both Thoughts AND Feelings! But this isn’t a chronological...

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My 5 most surprising reads of 2019! Surprising in a good way!   These books just exceded any expectation I had. I thought they’d...

22 days ago

My 5 most surprising reads of 2019! Surprising in a good way!  These books just exceded any expectation I had. I thought they’d...

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JOMP Book Photo Challenge

January 03 - Currently Reading

25 days ago

JOMP Book Photo Challenge January 03 - Currently Reading

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A friend just shared these with me and i cant…. idk if the illustrations are hilarious or horrifying.
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25 days ago

A friend just shared these with me and i cant…. idk if the illustrations are hilarious or horrifying.

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BOOKS I OWN AND WANT TO READ IN 2020!  In no particular order:    The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon   The...
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29 days ago

BOOKS I OWN AND WANT TO READ IN 2020! In no particular order:  The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon The...

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It’s also a print!

1 month ago

It’s also a print!

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12/5 | City Lights Bookstore, San Francisco

1 month ago

12/5 | City Lights Bookstore, San Francisco

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Sea Book Wyrm 📚🐉

1 month ago

Sea Book Wyrm 📚🐉