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Standing Next to Me

Alex Turner|Miles Kane|Arctic Monkeys|The Last Shadow Puppets obsession side blog
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Crying Lightning - Live at Royal Albert Hall, 2010 [X]
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19 hours ago

Crying Lightning - Live at Royal Albert Hall, 2010 [X]

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The Last Shadow Puppets (Alex Turner & Miles Kane) @ Cake Shop, NYC 05/03/2008 by Kyle Dean Reinford
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1 day ago

The Last Shadow Puppets (Alex Turner & Miles Kane) @ Cake Shop, NYC 05/03/2008 by Kyle Dean Reinford

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NME 07.11.2009 - I am not a tech savvy, hence the watermarks from the conversion from digital reader to .jpg. Feel free to...
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1 day ago

NME 07.11.2009 - I am not a tech savvy, hence the watermarks from the conversion from digital reader to .jpg. Feel free to...

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NME 21.04.2012
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NME 21.04.2012

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NME 23.05.2009  Check my blog for more recent  AM cover articles from NME :)
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1 day ago

NME 23.05.2009 Check my blog for more recent  AM cover articles from NME :)

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Arctic Monkeys, NME 29/08/2009 + bonus - article on Andy Nicholson  Browse my blog for more NME articles and other mainly...
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1 day ago

Arctic Monkeys, NME 29/08/2009 + bonus - article on Andy Nicholson Browse my blog for more NME articles and other mainly...

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Arctic Monkeys NME 09/04/2011  tell me if you want more of this old NME monkeys’ cover stories in hi res, two newest articles on...
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2 days ago

Arctic Monkeys NME 09/04/2011 tell me if you want more of this old NME monkeys’ cover stories in hi res, two newest articles on...

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Arctic Monkeys, NME 05.11.2011  09.04.2011  06.07.2013 Glastonbury  03.08.2013 AM
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2 days ago

Arctic Monkeys, NME 05.11.2011 09.04.2011 06.07.2013 Glastonbury 03.08.2013 AM

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The Dream Synopsis - Live at Rock en Seine 2016 [X]
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3 days ago

The Dream Synopsis - Live at Rock en Seine 2016 [X]

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Monkeys by Guy Aroch
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4 days ago

Monkeys by Guy Aroch

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Monkeys at Glasto 2013, NME July 6 issue  Latest NME article on AM upcoming release here
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4 days ago

Monkeys at Glasto 2013, NME July 6 issue Latest NME article on AM upcoming release here

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The photo with Alex holding polaroid camera and Monkeys holding polaroid photos of each other are from photoshoot by Martijn van...
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4 days ago

The photo with Alex holding polaroid camera and Monkeys holding polaroid photos of each other are from photoshoot by Martijn van...

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Here’s the story, morning glory
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4 days ago

Here’s the story, morning glory

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Arctic Monkeys, Peak District + Focus Creeps
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4 days ago

Arctic Monkeys, Peak District + Focus Creeps

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Arctic Monkeys + magazine covers
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5 days ago

Arctic Monkeys + magazine covers

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Alex Turner from Arctic Monkeys for GQ Magazine  http://bremex.tumblr.com/
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5 days ago

Alex Turner from Arctic Monkeys for GQ Magazine http://bremex.tumblr.com/

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Alex Turner  Another Man Magazine   S/S 2013 Issue   THE ARTIC MONKEYS  anothermag.com  arcticmonkeys.com
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5 days ago

Alex Turner Another Man Magazine S/S 2013 Issue THE ARTIC MONKEYS anothermag.com arcticmonkeys.com

French Rolling Stone Interview

Translation by Titplum

Original one

The Arctic Monkeys: Alex Turner says it all on the new album.

After a successful, Alex Turner of the Arctic Monkeys has decided to abandon the guitar riffs, listen to jazz and write an opus worthy of the great works of science-fiction.

This first album of the Arctic Monkeys in five years is at once lush and claustrophobic. It evokes a guy who becomes crazy, locked in the small piece of a pretty house located at the top of a hill, who built internally its fantastic universe and makes it live in piano notes. That is how, if we understand Alex Turner, “Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino” is born. The month of April is well underway. The frontman of the Arctic Monkeys descends from the top of his Hollywood house to take a coffee in the guise of breakfast. It is barely 10 hours in the morning. He wears a vintage costume; “Christian Dior,” he murmurs.

Turner has begun to write the new album in his home in 2016, playing on the piano Steinway Vertegrand, offered by his manager as a birthday gift. Alex Turner, who has long admired the stylistic metamorphoses of John Lennon and David Bowie, wanted to do something that had strictly nothing to do with the last record of his band; the multi-certified “AM”, full of heavy and groovy riffs. Never having composed on the piano before, he was convinced that this Vertegrand would provide a new sound… and he was right.

“This instrument, where my fingers have naturally fallen, has allowed me to discover new turns and jazzy progressions. Which would never have been as obvious if I had worked all of this on a guitar”. Among the other influences, we may cite the “History of Melody Nelson ” of Serge Gainsbourg and the jazz composition that François de Roubaix had composed for the classic Jean-Pierre Melville, the Samourai, in 1967.

It was impossible, by writing these songs on the piano, to avoid the news: “People have told me that the last record of the Arctic Monkeys sounded a bit "American”, but I didn’t have that impression at the time,“ he says.

But while Turner explored the Vertegrand, he also ended dealing with the themes of escape, virtual reality and the conquest of space. There are several references to science-fiction in the album, there is also a song which bears this name. "Science enables the creation of other worlds that can reflect ours, comment it,” says Turner,“ and it is this idea that interested me”.

Welcoming us in this Tranquility Base Hotel, according to the narrator Turner, is like opening the doors of a post-apocalyptic hotel which could very well be located on the Moon. No less. If we had to make a recap more down-to-earth: this album is captivating, constantly on the balance of the quest of entertainment - the desire to escape from it and the desire to create it - in a period of profound change.

All of this may catch the fans off guard, recognizes Turner, in particular those who have started to listen to the group since “AM”, who expect to hear roars of guitars. Jamie Cook has expressed his surprise when Turner has played the demos. But as they gradually understood each others, the piano and the guitar began to match each other as well. The drummer Matt Helders - who has joined the sessions, accompanied by the bassist Nick O'Malley, first to Hollywood and then in a mansion of the Parisian region called La Frette - adds that this new sound required a certain time to learn. “Each time we make a record, I want to propose something completely original, such as a Drum Beat to which no one would have thought,” says Helders. “This time, I sat up and I realized the challenge: it was no longer a question of what I was going to play, but how I could serve the songs”.

Is this album a momentum of insolence against the current expectations that we may have with the Arctic Monkeys? Alex Turner doesn’t say no. From the start, Turner did not necessarily thought about the reactions of the public. He let himself be carried away by his environment, as architectural model, true playground of this new album.

A word about the album cover. Turner has started to draw an hexagon - to represent this sixth opus - and the idea grew from there, inspired by architects of the middle of the century as Eero Saarinen and John Lautner. “I often went to the art supplies shop,” he says. He went there to buy cardboard, cut them with a knife, make different forms. “I spent a lot of time. Get up in the middle of the night and search, experiment. I started to call it "the model of the Entrance Hall”, exploring the idea of these objects that are sometimes located in the halls of large buildings - as in ‘Shining’ - with this famous miniature labyrinth in the entrance hall. He (Nicholson) overlooks the maquette, can imagine the people inside.“

This reference raises an obvious question: who, in the entourage of Turner, has thought that he had become mad because of its solitary obsessions? His girlfriend, the model Taylor Bagley, has fully supported his midnight crafts, just as their roommate Scoot. "He worked with me everyday”, concludes Turner. “And he has never told me that I was crazy

5 days ago

French Rolling Stone Interview Translation by Titplum Original one The Arctic Monkeys: Alex Turner says it all on the new...

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Interview with Zane Lowe, 2009 [X]
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5 days ago

Interview with Zane Lowe, 2009 [X]

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arctic monkeys in Q magazine 2009
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6 days ago

arctic monkeys in Q magazine 2009

Arctic Monkeys Intro Magazine Interview

Original interview 

Translation by imchrisjones

If you’ve ever wondered what a possible solo album by Arctic Monkeys singer Alex Turner might sound like, here’s the answer: “Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino” brings Turner’s crooning passion, hinted at in songs like “Cornerstone” or “ No. 1 Party Anthem ”, but especially on the two albums of his side project The Last Shadow Puppets, consistently to the point. The only problem: “Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino” is not a solo album, but the new Arctic Monkeys record .

However, the other musicians were added only after Turner had recorded the new songs at home in Los Angeles. After a constituent session in LA, Matt Helders, Jamie Cook, Nick O'Malley and Turner met at La Frette Studios late last year in the small French village of La Frette-sur-Seine, near Paris. Also featured were home producer James Ford, guitarist Tom Rowley, who is also a member of Arctic Monkeys Touring, and other old friends from Sheffield. “James Ford became a father a few months ago, and we already have a few children,” says Alex Turner on a beautiful March day in London. “We recorded the album in Europe because the family fathers always came home quickly.”

You can hear it in the new music, and it sounds like this quote: The Arctic Monkeyshave grown up. The band, which conquered an audience of millions twelve years ago with pimply teenage faces, stormy indie rock and northern English adolescent stories, no longer exists. Turner turned 32 in January. He gives the few interviews to the album alone. That’s how the band decided it’s their songs, above all. Nonetheless, the one-hour talk is about how the others have left their mark on the new album. That they have done that, you realize only after a few passes: The eleven songs on the album follow a continuous pace and a similar mood. It’s a kind of modern lounge music, jazz-inspired, absolutely classic, thinking of Brill Buildingand Tin Pan AlleyThe last song is called “The Ultracheese” and is reminiscent of “Blueberry Hill” by Fats Domino.

Despite these references, the album sounds fresh, modern, noteworthy, by references to Trump and other social developments in parts even Zeitgeistdiagnostisch. In addition to Turner’s cleverly interwoven texts between reality and the dream world, this music draws its special magic from O'Malley’s softly dominant bass lines, the accentuated but effective playing of the former brachial drummer Matt Helders, and Jamie Cook’s highly-melodious, master-hand-arranged guitar lines.

The responsibilities were not always so clearly defined: “We exchanged the instruments during the recording,” says Turner. “Nick played the guitar, Matt Keyboards, Jamie and me Bass, other friends also contributed something - that’s how a common spirit came together.” Turner goes to great lengths to clarify the context. It will not be a quote-spinner anymore, but the shyness of previous interviews is a thing of the past. He has lived through the last twelve, 13 years in fast motion, every day a new stage, another studio, another city. Now he has come to London to explain his most personal music so far. He wears loose leisure clothes, long hair - and a beard. This offers a perfect introduction to the interview:

Alex, on change.org, there is a hopefully not quite serious petition that aims to shave off your beard. Will you follow this call? There is a petition? I had no Idea. But it amuses me. It’s really crazy that people are so interested in hairstyles and stuff.

You could read this petition as a metaphor for your celebrity status today. You supposedly just wanted to be one of the Strokes, as you sing in the first line of the new song “Star Treatment”. Instead, I’m sitting here with a damned petition that’s about my looks! By the way, the Strokes are still the biggest, I saw them live two years ago. And this new The Voidz album is great, too.

Twelve years after the debut you are more successful than the Strokes ever were.The new album “Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino” acts as a reflection of this very public expired development. At the beginning you were basically half children . When I turned 32 in January, my mother congratulated me and asked if I was even aware that I have now spent half of my life in this band. She wanted to know if it was not time for something else, something sensible, for example.

The old parents question. Your parents have supported you in your musical ambitions, right? Even very. Since I started playing the guitar as a kid. Later we rehearsed in our garage, and I was allowed to spend a year in school to focus on the band. My mother did not mean this birthday question very seriously, but she started a process with me.

Do you have to worry? Not that one. But with the tour to the last album something has come to an end for us. Nobody could have said afterwards how it goes on. Until then, everything was like an eternal school trip. But now some of us got married, there were the first children, pregnancies. Changes were in the air. And so it happened: we have seen each other much less often in the past five years than at any other time in our lives.

While Matt Helders and you continued to make music, almost nothing was heard of the other two during the break. Jamie Cook became a father some time ago. He enjoys being able to take care of his family during the breaks.

Matt Helders took the break most spectacularly: In the band of Iggy Pop you do not play every day. That’s still completely surreal for me. I watched two shows, it was so emotional. It was best in New York. Actually, we did not want to go because we had a shoot with the Last Shadow Puppets during the day and were just flat. With the first chords of “Lust For Life” the fatigue was blown away. That evening we felt like we were seven years old again. I was so incredibly proud to see my friend up there on this stage! He did that so smart, he was so cool. The bastard chewed gum while playing.

You know each other since early childhood. I know Matthew longer than anyone else. We were in school together, and he lived right around the corner with us. But the others did not live much further away, they joined our clique shortly thereafter.

Since then a lot has happened, among others you are no longer neighbors. That’s right, of course. But that much has not changed again: When we went to the studio at the end of last year everything was straight away as it always was. The break has done us good. Before, I had reservations, it could be different.

The advantage of old friendships: you do not need a warm-up phase. Helders is probably the funniest guy I know, we’ve had more fun than we’ve had in a long time. When we met for the first time, someone put on the first Streets album. It certainly ran five times in a row, and suddenly everything was back to 16.

Was this a post-break meeting to discuss the next steps? We should have done that, but somehow it did not work that way. We met after the Iggy tour and our one with the Shadow Puppets , but did not have the slightest idea what to do. It has not come out much - except the realization that we still all like each other and want to continue at some point.

First, did you continue on your own path? Back then I was in the middle of a production with the American singer Alexandra Savior . She and I wrote a lot for this album and made a lot of demos on a small eight-track recorder. This bedroom producer number was new to me, so we never worked with the band. I really enjoyed this method and wanted to approach the next Monkeys album in a similar way. “ Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino” started with a piano, a recording device and me in one room.

The album musically opens a new chapter in Arctic Monkeys and acts in part as an interim review of your past history. Basically, we’ve already started with a retrospective: Our debut was all about our early youth. But sure, the new album is a reflection in ignorance of the future. I sat at home and thought about how things developed. I was just in the indie disco and danced to the Strokes - and suddenly I stand on such stages myself. In between, I never had time to reflect that reasonably, it went on and on. I felt an urgent need to write about these things. At the same time, I have not found any poetry in this thought for a long time and did not know how to implement it musically.

Can you explain how you did it then? That’s always hard for me. Maybe you have to imagine a sculptor working on a block of marble for so long and then refining it until a sculpture comes out of it. However, this picture is unbelievably cheesy … At least I tried to trick myself. To somehow enable me to write this music and lyrics.

How did you do that? The breakthrough was the use of the piano. It reminded me of my dad, these jazz-like lounge chords have put me in a mood of their own in which I could create a kind of character for these lyrics. A fake figure, if you like.

Your father is a jazz musician. You played Sinatra songs at the piano when you were seven, so the album is also a return to your very early roots. No, you can not say that, I was not that good at the time, I could not play any of these songs properly. But yes, my dad played saxophone and trumpet and a little piano. He himself might call himself a pianist. In fact, I was thinking a lot about him and his game when I wrote the album. Some of the piano parts remind me of the things I heard as a kid from the next room.

The lyrics are basically like rap lyrics for me. They are thus in an interesting contrast to the very classical music. That would be the biggest compliment I could get. During production, I came to believe that the lyrics were written modern enough to counterbalance the music. The album should be classically designed, but not like a retro event, that was very important to me. We deliberately counteracted production as well.

The lyrics live from precise, almost journalistic observations mixed with surrealistic metaphors and authentic dialogical sequences such as in the song “One Point Perspective”. The line »This stunning documentary that no one else saw / Search beautiful photography, it’s worth it for the opening scene / I’ve been driving ‘round listening to the score« could be taken from a pretentious cliché small talk at a vernissage. Do you record something one-to-one, or does that spring from your imagination? I always and always write down everything that I like. For example, you referred to Matt Helders as Physical Monster, which I immediately noted. And this dialogical approach is a very effective way of staging my themes.

Add to that a special sense of humor: the song ends very abruptly. One could almost think that something was wrong with the system. Are you doing something extra? The idea was to underline the text musically. You surely know that from parties too. When everyone is drunk, messing around senseless things and constantly losing the thread, I wanted to illustrate with this end: Suddenly the conversation breaks off.

At first glance, the album sounds like you could imagine a possible Alex Turner solo album. How did the other Monkeys find their place in this music? I was never interested in making a solo album. I am a part of this band and would disrespect the other. Nevertheless, I wanted to make this music, it was in me. When you compose on the piano, you automatically get different results than on the guitar. And it was important to me to say goodbye to the realism of most of the Arctic-Monkeys stuff. Overall, it developed in a direction that soon made me realize she had absolutely nothing to do with what people would expect from a Monkeys record.

At what point in time did you let the others participate in the new songs? Relatively early. When I finished the first demos, I invited Jamie to listen to everything and work on the songs together. He recorded a few guitars, had complementary ideas and was pretty enthusiastic overall. His enthusiasm has taken away my uncertainty. After a while, we brought Nick into the studio and played him our demo of The Star Treatment. He was also thrilled, and so I gradually got the green light from everyone.

You live in Los Angeles for several years. Has the city become a second home for you? Of course, LA is pretty much the opposite of Sheffield, where again I miss nothing because nothing has changed since I left there. Nevertheless, I do not remember exactly why I moved away at all. I have great friends in LA, but otherwise? What keeps me in this city? Especially the many equipment that I have amassed there. Pretty cheap explanation, right?

Do you have a better one? When I was eight, I went to San Francisco with my grandma and a few other relatives. We drove down the coast road and stayed in Los Angeles with friends my grandmother knew from one of her previous trips. For me that has remained one of the most formative memories of my childhood.

Arctic Monkeys is a bit of a silly name, which is as unprinted on the cover of the new album as on the three albums in front of it. How often do you regret the name? Every single day!

6 days ago

Arctic Monkeys Intro Magazine Interview Original interview  Translation by imchrisjones If you’ve ever wondered what a...

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Miles Kane for Foxes Magazine

By Tomas Turpie

8 days ago

Miles Kane for Foxes Magazine By Tomas Turpie

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The Big Issue Magazine - by killing.the.joke
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8 days ago

The Big Issue Magazine - by killing.the.joke

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GAFFA Magazine

8 days ago

GAFFA Magazine

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Arctic Monkeys live at Pinkpop Festival, 2007 [X]
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8 days ago

Arctic Monkeys live at Pinkpop Festival, 2007 [X]

Arctic Monkeys Mondo Sonoro Interview

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Quick Translation by paraselene

-He says that they haven’t kept anything secret, they’re just not sharing everything on social media. However he’s been open with fans and he noticed there’s a bigger  expectation towards this album

- It may seem that he’s been lying on the beach for five years but he feels he hasn’t stopped for a minute ( Alexandra Savior, TLSP…)

- As soon as he was done with TLSP ,he started recording demos. This album took more time because he spent more time working on his own. He’s become more perfectionist

- He’s dying to go back onstage with the monkeys and play new things, but at the same time he wishes to be back with the piano and write more songs

-  There’s too many love songs “ he loves you – she  loves you”, he wants to go beyond that. He’s inspired by the news, cinema and literature.

- First song he wrote was Start Treatment. The album sounds like soul and jazz, it reminds him of his father playing piano. Nick Cave, Cohen, Joe Cocker, Leon Rusell, Nina Simone, Dion… are his influences. Also Gainsburg, Nino Ferrer, The Rolling Stones…

- It’s a big leap. At some point during recordings, James Ford and Alex looked at each other like “we’ve gone too far”. Ford’s wife said they shouldn’t be afraid, they still sounded like AM

- He has great trust in James Ford and everything he does. Maybe they’ll call Josh Homme for the next record

- When asked if he sees himself experimenting outside music: “I’d like to… write something not meant for a song, but for now I don’t have enough confidence” He wishes he was brave enough to pursue that, someday.

9 days ago

Arctic Monkeys Mondo Sonoro Interview Quick Translation by paraselene -He says that they haven’t kept anything secret, they’re...

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Miles for Q Magazine
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9 days ago

Miles for Q Magazine

9 days ago

Int: If you guys could just take a second to describe everyone in the band, like their personalities? Jamie: Ehh… Alex: Jamie’s...

9 days ago

Just here to say that one time Alex called a white spider a bone-colored gentleman during a discussion of the desert (Zane Lowe...

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Professional Photo Magazine - Issue 149
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11 days ago

Professional Photo Magazine - Issue 149

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Arctic Monkeys performing “Crying Lightning” at MTV Studios, 2009 [X]
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11 days ago

Arctic Monkeys performing “Crying Lightning” at MTV Studios, 2009 [X]

So on the night that TBH&C dropped, this Chicago radio station did a livestream of the album with commentary from Alex in between each song. (Here’s a link to a google drive folder with audio recordings of the interview). I haven’t seen a transcript of the interview so far, so I decided to write it up myself!

Walt: Song number two, One Point Perspective. Where did this song come from?

Alex: Well, One Point Perspective, I think…it’s a technique that’s sometimes applied to illustration, but I found out about this phrase through cinema - specifically the films of Stanley Kubrick. It’s a move he uses in every one of his films at a certain point. It’s where…it’s the framing of a shot with the subject at the center of the shot, and…almost a symmetry on either side of them. It’s quite inherently unsettling as a viewer when it’s used, because you’re not used to seeing something ominous about it…or that is the suggestion with that.

Like, you think about the monolith at the end of the bed in 2001, right? That’s the shot…that’s one point perspective. You know, we don’t really go into that in the song at all, but there’s something about the feeling that this creates in these movies that I think is…in tune with the types of ideas we’re exploring in the lyrics of this tune.

W: You wrote this album in a different way than you have in the past - you wrote it on piano. Why that change?

A: That’s true. Well, one just turned up one day at my house. Actually, it were a thirtieth birthday gift from my manager. Very kind gift. The last time he gave me a musical instrument were when I was twenty-one, a LG-1 Gibson acoustic guitar, and I wrote a lot of tunes on that. And I think I’ll write on it again, I would imagine, but I think I’ve reached a point with, not just that guitar, but trying to write on guitars, generally, I had a feeling where it was going to go when I picked up the guitar, and I think that feeling prevented me from getting anywhere.

I think what I’m trying to say is, Walt, before the piano showed up on this one, I don’t remember having many ideas, and after it came, my imagination was reignited.

W: You recorded a great deal of this stuff on your own, at your place, the Lunar Surface, on a TASCAM 8-track, old school, and then you weren’t able to recreate some of those sounds when you went to La Frette in Paris?

A: Well, a lot of the vocals that are on the record, as we’re hearing it now, are from the 8-track demos, yeah. And there’s the odd bit of like, bass and drums and a few keyboard things, here and there - but a lot of that we did actually redo at La Frette. Most of the vocals, with the exception of like, Science Fiction and Ultracheese and one or two others, maybe - it’s all the vocals from earlier takes that I’ve done on what I thought were then, like, demos.

I think it’s just…there’s an opportunity, maybe, before you even think you’ve completely written it - the first time you record something - there’s this opportunity to get something out of that performance that’s specific to that moment in time, you know?

W: This next song, Four Out of Five, seems like a commentary on a Yelp review. I mean, you’re talking about a taqueria on the moon, no less. What a fantastic concept, that is. Where did that idea come from?

A: I think the song Four Out of Five definitely stemmed from the song from which we take the album title - Tranquility Base: Hotel & Casino - where there is this sort of vague suggestion of a moon colony…in which there is this hotel and casino complex.

Four Out of Five begins to explore that a little bit further…the idea that even this moon casino complex that - you may not even have to leave the comfort of your own home to get to - is not exempt from the wave of gentrification.

W: *laughs*

W: In the middle section of the song, there’s all of these modulations or key changes which are incredibly important to get to the end with the giant chorus. How difficult was it to write all of those steps to get back around to where you’ve got it perfectly lined up for the chorus?

A: Certainly nowhere near as difficult as trying to describe it to you is going to be.

W: *laughing* It was an easy thing to do? I mean, even in the lyrics - “I’ll raise you another semitone” - you actually refer to it.

A: Ah, thank you, I’m glad somebody finally picked up…I’m glad we finally get to discuss that. It wasn’t a two minute job, I don’t think. I think what’s happening musically there is just…it was about giving myself the time to explore what was there. You have the piece of rock and you’re sort of chipping away to reveal the sculpture inside it, that sort of thing, I think that’s it. *laughing* Michelangelo idea, if you don’t mind me going there for a minute.

W: Was there a song on the album that was more difficult than the others to record?

A: I think recording Four Out of Five - that was a challenge, and definitely…if we were to talk to James Ford, the producer, about it, he would attest to that. It was…It took a long time to get that right, like the back half of that.

I know we mentioned that Alexandra Saviour record earlier - there’s a tune on that called Until You’re Mine - which was…she’d written the front half of it, and her and I wrote the back half of it together. And on this song, it goes…it ends up in somewhere completely different to where it starts - and that happened as a result of how we wrote it, you know, she wrote it to me before, and then we completed it together…using some ideas that I’d had, I think, for something else before. So it was a bit of…kind of two things welded together, but hopefully that isn’t completely apparent - however, when you get to the end of it, you’re in a completely different place than when you started.

I can’t remember another time where that has really happened, to that extent, in anything that I’ve written before, and I think that Four Out of Five took a cue from that song, Until You’re Mine.

W: It definitely does do that - it does take you to somewhere different, and then it tacks on a little bit at the end-

A: A little bit at the end for you there, Walt, just to remind you where you came from…cracks you back down to Earth.

W: The World’s First Ever Monster Truck Front Flip: explain.

A: Well, it was an actual event that occurred a year or two ago. I mean, it’s truly remarkable, like, let’s agree on that, before we go any further.

W: *laughing* Of course.

A: Yeah, it just seemed absolutely appropriate…as a way to start the second side of our LP.

W: You think of the album as two sides when you’re putting it together and sequencing it?

A: I do, Walt, yeah - always have done, really. I think…it helps me to conclude everything…thinking about it like that, I don’t know, I like that it’s got a beginning, a middle and an end, you know? I mean, that’s always been on the agenda…I think it really helps.

W: When you were recording in La Frette, you actually had the musicians in the studio, playing all at the same time, which is seldom done, these days. A lot of times it’s all assembly line - go do the drums, and then you add the bass later - but everybody playing in one room at the same time - where did that inspiration come from?

A: Well, that came from a lot of records - some of my favorite records were recorded in that way…Pet Sounds, obviously, was famously done like that. There’s this record called Born to Be with You by Dion that I love very much, as well - that was, as I understand it, recorded in this way, like, two pianos, and other people playing acoustic guitar, two drummers - everything spilling all over, from each microphone into the one next to it.

Anyway, I don’t know if it was completely appropriate for everything on this record - to do it in this way - but it’s something that I’ve always wanted to try. So we’ve got a sort of a hybrid between that and these 388 TASCAM recordings from home that invariably…while we were doing this live approach, we were playing along to the recordings that we’d taken to La Frette

What I learned from this experience was there’s definitely a certain energy you get from nine or ten people - the way you play in that environment is obviously going to be totally different than the way you play when you’re taking your pedalboard in the control room and going like that. Also, you’re not able to be as precious about everything, of course.

W: Now, on this next song, Batphone, you talk about “getting sucked into a hole on a handheld device”. Is that a commentary on the dependency we all seem to have on cell phones?

A: Exactly. Honestly, Walt, it’s not like I really want to write about that stuff - it’s…well I have done, on multiple times. I just realized, the other day, we were just

*cellphone goes off in the background*

A: …and you hear the ding of the handheld device in the background, there.

W: *laughing* Right on cue.

A: Right on cue, see? *laughing* I don’t know, I was about to say that, you know, I don’t want to write these songs, I don’t want to write about…the ringing that just went off in the background. But it’s there, so I suppose it becomes more about finding a way to do it.

W: I gotta talk about - you actually built a physical model of the hotel and casino. What’s it made of, how long did it take, and what are you going to do with that thing?

A: Well, that part of the question I truly don’t know the answer to. The two parts before that - it’s made out of illustration board and a dowel, and… *laughing* What was the other bit of the question?

W: *laughing* How long did it take?

A: *still laughing* How long did it take me? The whole process…it were a few months…there were some other things that it could’ve been. I was trying to do album cover art, but there were a few things that could’ve been on that cover. The model was one of the few that - I think of it as like, the model in the lobby of a hotel - so there were other things from the lobby of the hotel that I was sort of trying to explore and creating, as well. But this one just kind of won out.

W: [talking about The Ultracheese] Kind of leaves you wanting more, there. Kind of unresolved.

A: I think you could say that, perhaps - you’re a musician, Walt, so - I suppose it’s unresolved in the musical department, but I think that, perhaps in the other side of that, it does resolve itself.

W: Your last line - “But I haven’t stopped loving you once” - awesome last line. It really is a great way to end. But then you have that last little - you sing like a note at the end, and it just kind of leaves it hanging, It’s a perfect last end to this piece of music.

A: I’m glad you think so.

12 days ago

Alex Turner Interview - 101WKQX

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(translated by midsummersky)    OOR magazine interview: Arctic Monkeys To the moon and back   Major Turner to ground control!...
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13 days ago

(translated by midsummersky) OOR magazine interview: Arctic Monkeys To the moon and back Major Turner to ground control!...

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Arctic Monkeys performing “Suck It And See” on The Graham Norton Show, 2011 [X]
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13 days ago

Arctic Monkeys performing “Suck It And See” on The Graham Norton Show, 2011 [X]

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When Alex squeezes himself very tightly during Cornerstone.                  x x x x
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15 days ago

When Alex squeezes himself very tightly during Cornerstone. x x x x

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The Last Shadow Puppets interview for Musikexpress 2016.   Someone translate pls.   Photo by Peter Kaaden
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16 days ago

The Last Shadow Puppets interview for Musikexpress 2016.  Someone translate pls.  Photo by Peter Kaaden

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TLSP: then and now
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16 days ago

TLSP: then and now

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Don’t Look Back In Anger // November 13, 2017

Check // July 22, 2018

Super ocho // April 13, 2019

Alex through Matt’s eyes during the Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino era

17 days ago

Don’t Look Back In Anger // November 13, 2017 Check // July 22, 2018 Super ocho // April 13, 2019 Alex through Matt’s eyes...

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Interview from Rosklide, 2007 [X]
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18 days ago

Interview from Rosklide, 2007 [X]

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… “It’s always the maddest people that come up to me. The other day an old bloke in the queue for the coffee shop said, “I just...
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19 days ago

… “It’s always the maddest people that come up to me. The other day an old bloke in the queue for the coffee shop said, “I just...

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TLSP live at Canal Plus Studios, 2008 [X]
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20 days ago

TLSP live at Canal Plus Studios, 2008 [X]

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The Last Shadow Puppets @ Conan (October 29, 2008).
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21 days ago

The Last Shadow Puppets @ Conan (October 29, 2008).

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(via alexturner-blog1)

21 days ago

(via alexturner-blog1)